Nyapari: art centre renovations and expansion

First posted on 28 November 2009 under Kanpi & Nyapari.
This article has been updated and archived.
Tags: art centres & infrastructure

Summary

Tjungu Palya[i] is an Anangu-controlled arts organisation based in Nyapari.

In mid 2009, the Federal Government allocated over $600,000 to Tjungu Palya to enable it to refurbish its existing art centre and build an additional structure for community activities.

The Paper Trail

Tjungu Palya is an organisation owned and controlled by Anangu artists. Its members are drawn from the APY communities of Nyapari, Kanpi and Watarru, as well as smaller homelands like Angatja.[ii]

Tjungu Palya promotes and strengthens “individual and community cultural and social systems through art and craft activities.”[iii]  This includes helping members produce and sell high-quality works of art.

Tjungu Palya became an incorporated body in March 2006.[iv] As of June 2008, it had more than 65 members and operated out of a modest building in Nyapari.[v]

Funding Allocations

In 2006, the Federal Department of Health and Ageing allocated over $1.3 million towards the cost of building a swimming pool in Watarru. In June 2008, “a decision was taken … that construction of the pool would not proceed.”[vi]

On 15 June 2009, the Federal Department of Health and Ageing agreed to allow a portion of the original funding to be redirected to Tjungu Palya for the purpose of renovating and extend its facilities in Nyapari.[vii]

Specifically, the Department provided $628,000 (GST exclusive) for:

  • the refurbishment of Tjungu Arts’ existing centre,
  • the construction of a new building “suitable for community activities,” and
  • landscaping of a campground.[viii]

In November 2009, the Department advised the Paper Tracker that:

  • it expected this work to be completed by November 2010.
  • the decision to re-allocate the funding was made in consultation with the Watarru community.[ix]

This article has been archived and will no longer be updated. It will, however, remain accessible online as a source of background information for anyone wishing to undertake further research on this issue. Information included in the article was current at the time it was archived. Keep in mind, however, that Ministerial changes and names of departments, among other things, may have since changed.


[i] “Tjungu palya” is a Pitjantjatjara expression meaning “happy together”.

[ii] Hopton, I. September 2007, “Nganampa Mantaku Mapanya: a map of our land,” MESA Journal. Issue 46, p7.

[iii] Tjungu Palya Aboriginal Corporation. May 2009, “The Rule Book,” p3. Available at: http://www.oric.gov.au/document.aspx?concernID=104625. Accessed: 27 November 2009.

[iv] Hopton, I. September 2007, “Nganampa Mantaku Mapanya: a map of our land,” MESA Journal. Issue 46, p7.

[v] Tjungu Palya Aboriginal Corporation. 2008, “General Report (Published)” p5-7. Available at: http://www.oric.gov.au/document.aspx?concernID=104625. Accessed: 27 November 2009. Also: Nyapari Community. February 2008, Nyapari Community Structure Plan No. 1, p9.

[vi] Halton, J (DoHA). 14 September 2009. Letter to Rev. Peter McDonald.

[vii] Halton, J (DoHA). 14 September 2009. Letter to Rev. Peter McDonald.

[viii] Halton, J (DoHA). 17 November 2009. Letter to Rev. Peter McDonald.

[ix] Halton, J (DoHA). 17 November 2009. Letter to Rev. Peter McDonald.

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