Amata and Mimili: local implementation plans

First posted on 2 August 2010 under Amata, Looking Ahead, Making Decisions & Mimili.
This article has been updated and archived.
Tags: COAG & planning

Summary

In late 2008, the Australian and South Australian Governments agreed to formulate comprehensive “local implementation plans” to improve the delivery of services to Amata and Mimili. Under the terms of this agreement, these plans had to be developed in consultation with local Anangu.

The plans for Amata and Mimili were finalised in June 2010 and cover the period 2010 to 2014.

Both plans were formally reviewed in 2011.[i] As of 31 January 2013, revised versions of the plans had not been publicly released.[ii]

The Paper Trail

Background

On 29 November 2008, the Council of Australian Governments agreed to a new National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.[iii]

The Agreement‘s primary objective was to improve the delivery and coordination of government services in Amata, Mimili and 27 other remote Indigenous communities across Australia.[iv]

More specifically, it aimed to “raise the standard and range of services delivered to Indigenous families” living in these communities so that they are “broadly consistent” with services provided to non-Indigenous Australians “in similar sized and located communities”.[v]

The Agreement – which built on earlier commitments to “close the gap” on Indigenous disadvantage – came into force on 27 January 2009 and was set to run for a period of five and a half years; that is, until 30 June 2014.[vi]

Click here to download a copy of the Agreement (file size: 416KB)

Local implementation plans

An essential part of the Agreement was a commitment to develop local implementation plans for each of the 29 priority communities (including Amata and Mimili).[vii]

Under the terms of the Agreement, each local implementation plan must:

  • ­ be developed in “consultation with local Indigenous people”,
  • ­ include “performance indicators and benchmarks”, and
  • ­ be “implemented in a timely and accountable way.”[viii]

The plans for Amata and Mimili were finalised in June 2010. Celebrations to mark the end of this process, combined with formal signing ceremonies, were held in Amata and Mimili on 30 June and 1 July 2010 respectively.[ix]

A brief overview of the plans

The plans for Amata and Mimili have the same format and structure. Each one runs to more than 100 pages and is divided into four main sections.[x] Among other things, these sections aim to:

  • ­ explain why and how the plan was developed,[xi]
  • ­ summarise community-specific baseline data,[xii]
  • ­ identify the “strengths plus some of the major challenges” for that particular community,[xiii]
  • ­ introduce seven interrelated “building blocks” around which the plan is organised,[xiv]
  • ­ list 20 key outcomes that the plan has been designed to achieve,[xv]
  • ­ list 71 strategies and more than 300 actions that will be undertaken to achieve those outcomes,[xvi]
  • ­ indicate which government agencies are responsible for implementing particular actions,[xvii]
  • ­ explain how the implementation of the plan will be monitored,[xviii] and
  • ­ outline the role of the State/Federal “Board of Management.[xix]

Click here to download a copy of the Amata’s plan (note large file size: 7.69MB)

Click here to download a copy of Mimili’s plan (note large file size: 8.11MB)

2011 review

The Amata and Mimili plans were scheduled to be reviewed in 2011 and, again, in 2013. Each reviews was expected to provide an opportunity for:

the Governments and the community … to renegotiate the [plan] and make any agreed amendments to accommodate new priorities or arrangements.[xx]

On 18 February 2011, the Australian Government reported that:

  • the State/Federal Board of Management had decided that the process of reviewing the plans “should be organic and progressive and involve strong engagement with the Amata and Mimili communities,” and
  • in due course, updated versions of each plan would be posted on the website of the Federal Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.[xxi]

In June 2011, the Australian Government advised the Paper Tracker that:

  • the Board of Management had approved a review process in April 2011; and
  • community workshops would be held in Amata and Mimili in “coming months” to review each plan’s progress “from the communities’ perspective.”[xxii]

The advice continued:

Representatives from key government agencies have been invited to attend [the workshops] to answer questions and engage directly with the community about their agency’s respective … actions. The community will also have the opportunity to provide feedback on the [plans] before, during, and after the workshops through a range of informal and formal channels … Outcomes from the community workshops will be considered by the Board of Management and incorporated into the … review process.[xxiii]

The community workshops were held in Amata in June 2011 and in Mimili in November 2011. Each workshop “identified approximately ten government priority actions.”[xxiv]

On 26 March 2012, the Australian Government advised the Paper Tracker that:

The outcomes of the review will be presented to communities and following their endorsement will be made publicly available.[xxv]

On 22 May 2012, the Federal Minister for Indigenous Affairs (Hon Jenny Macklin) advised Mr Rowan Ramsay MP (Member for Grey) that the revised plans:

  • were “being developed in close consultation with the local communities and due to be completed in mid-2012”, and
  • would in due course “be made publicly available on my Department’s website”.[xxvi]

As of 31 January 2013, the revised plans had not been posted online.[xxvii]

Other information

In February 2012, the Federal Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs advised a South Australian Parliamentary Committee that as of 24 November 2011:

  • 514 of the actions in the Amata and Mimili plans were “in progress”,
  • 98 of these 514 actions (i.e. 19%) “were on track to be delivered within a specific time frame”,
  • the South Australian Government was responsible for 339 of the Amata and Mimili actions, and
  • 65 of these 339 actions had been completed, 155 were “in progress” and 179 had “not started”.[xxviii]

Please note: earlier editions of this webpage included the Paper Tracker’s 2010 review of the original plans. To access that review click here.

This article has been archived and will no longer be updated. It will, however, remain accessible online as a source of background information for anyone wishing to undertake further research on this issue. Information included in the article was current at the time it was archived. Keep in mind, however, that Ministerial changes and names of departments, among other things, may have since changed.


[i] Government of South Australia. February 2012 “Progress on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands: Service Delivery and Development”, p8.

[ii] See: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. 2013. “Local Implementation Plans” webpage: Available at: http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/our-responsibilities/indigenous-australians/publications-articles/communities-regions/local-implementation-plans. Accessed: 31 January 2013. See also: APY Regional Operation Centre  (FaHCSIA). 26 March 2012. Email to J. Nicholls.

[iii] Council of Australian Governments, 29 November 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery”. See also: Council of Australian Governments, November 2008, “Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement,” fact sheet.

[iv] See: Council of Australian Governments, 29 November 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.” Also: Council of Australian Governments, November 2008, “Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement,” fact sheet. Available at: http://www.coag.gov.au/coag_meeting_outcomes/2008-11-29/docs/20081129_remote_service_delivery_factsheet.pdf. Accessed 30 May 2009.

[v] Council of Australian Governments, 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery,” p5-6.

[vi] Council of Australian Governments, 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery,” p3, p4 and p6. See also: House of Representatives. 2009, “Coordinator-General for Remote Indigenous Services Bill 2009: Explanatory Memorandum. (Circulated by the authority of the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, the Hon Jenny Macklin MP),” p2.

[vii] See: Council of Australian Governments, 29 November 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery,” p6, p8-10.

[viii] See: Council of Australian Governments, 29 November 2008, “National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery,” p8-10.

[ix] McColm, M (FaHCSA). 26 July 2010. Email to J. Nicholls; Weaver, M (FaHCSIA). 25 July 2010. Email to J. Nicholls. Also: FaHCSIA. 12 July 2010, “ROC News July 2010 – LIP sign off ,” email newsletter, APY Lands Remote Service Delivery – Adelaide Regional Operations Centre.

[x] The electronic version of the Mimili plan runs to 110 pages while the Amata plan is 106 pages in length. The four main sections are entitled “Section 1: Remote Service Delivery”; “Section 2: The big picture”; “Section 3: The Local Implementation Plan”; and “Section 4: Outcomes, strategies and action”. A fifth section – “Reference Guide” – contains a simple list of 16 documents.

[xi] See Section1 and Section 3.2 of each plan

[xii] See Section 2 of each plan.

[xiii] See Section 2 of each plan, especially p12.

[xiv] See: Commonwealth of Australia, 2010. Planning together for Mimili’s future: APY Lands Remote Service Delivery, Local Implementation Plan, p3. Also Section 4 of the same document.

[xv] See Section 4 of each plan.

[xvi] See Section 4 of each plan.

[xvii] See Section 4 of each plan.

[xviii] See Section 3.2 of each plan.

[xix] See Section 3.3 of each plan.

[xx] Commonwealth of Australia, 2010. Planning together for Mimili’s future: APY Lands Remote Service Delivery, Local Implementation Plan, p25; Commonwealth of Australia, 2010. Planning together for Amata’s future: APY Lands Remote Service Delivery, Local Implementation Plan, p25.

[xxi] Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. 30 March 2011. Reply to question on notice asked by Senator Siewert during the 2010-11 Additional Estimates Hearings, Questions No.176, 178 and 179.

[xxii] Smallhorn, T (FaHCSIA). 3 June 2011. Email to J. Nicholls.

[xxiii] Smallhorn, T (FaHCSIA). 3 June 2011. Email to J. Nicholls.

[xxiv] APY Regional Operation Centre  (FaHCSIA). 26 March 2012. Email to J. Nicholls. Also: Government of South Australia. February 2012 “Progress on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands: Service Delivery and Development”, p8.

[xxv] APY Regional Operation Centre  (FaHCSIA). 26 March 2012. Email to J. Nicholls.

[xxvi] Macklin, J. 22 May [2012]. Letter to R. Ramsay.

[xxvii] See: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. 2013. “Local Implementation Plans” webpage: Available at: http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/our-responsibilities/indigenous-australians/publications-articles/communities-regions/local-implementation-plans. Accessed: 31 January 2013.

[xxviii] Parliament of South Australia. February 2012. “Response to questions taken on notice from FaHCSIA witness Mr James Armitage”, Aboriginal Lands Parliamentary Standing Committee, p3. (link to document).

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